OCH Sports Medicine & Orthopedics Center - (2024)

PATIENT FORMS

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ON-SITE TESTING

OrthopedicX-Rays X-rays are commonly used in clinical practice to diagnose fractures. Characteristics of the fracture such as the type, deformity and soft tissue / joint involvement are used to guide management.

Casting Casts areused to immobilize injured bones, promote healing, and reduce pain and swelling while the bone heals. They are sometimes put on an arm or leg after surgery to protect the bone and ensure it remains in proper alignment.

Splinting A rigid or flexible device that maintains in position a displaced or movable part; also used to keep in place and protect an injured part" or as "a rigid or flexible material used to protect, immobilize, or restrict motion in a part.

Bracing Bracing is an effective form of treatment for certain orthopedic conditions. A brace, by restricting movement and relieving pressure, promotes healing, takes weight off an injured area, and provides post-operative support. Braces are commonly used to support the spine, knee, ankle and elbow. Anorthosis or orthopedic appliance that supports or holds in correct position a part of the body and can allow motion at adjacent joints. (https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/brace)

Wound Care Refers to specific types of treatment for pressure sores, skin ulcers and other wounds that break the skin. The purpose of wound care is twofold: 1) to relieve pressure on a weight-bearing part of the body such as a boney prominence (hand, arm, knee, heel, hip or buttocks) that rests on a bed, wheelchair, another body part, a splint or other hard object, and 2) to treat the ulcerated wound itself when skin has become weakened, inflamed and possibly infected. Although the current discussion of wound care relates primarily to pressure ulcers, other skin ulcers and burn wounds may benefit from similar treatment principles and practices. (https://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/wound-care)

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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BEFORE YOUR SURGERY

The clinic will notify you the day before surgery of the time you are to report to the hospital. REMEMBER, nothing to eat or drink after midnight the morning before your procedure. If you develop any redness, fever, rashes on the limb (or in other places) needing surgery, the procedure may be cancelled.

PAIN MEDICINE

Refill requests should be made Monday - Thursday. Please allow ample time for narcotic refills to be considered for approval and processed. Strict prescribing guidelines exist and must be followed.

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS

At discharge, ask questions. Your nurse and discharge team are there for you. Ask your nurse to go over your medicines. It is important to make sure you are on the right ones at discharge.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Physical therapy will most likely be needed and will be ordered by your provider. If this is prescribed or recommended, please attend. It is part of your care.

FOLLOWING SURGERY, TIME TO GO HOME

Call immediately if you experience numbness, limb coldness or an acute change in limb function. Notify the clinic if you have increasing pain, changes in skin color, drainage on your dressing, foul odor or pressing concerns.

In addition to pain medicine, ice and elevation often help with post-operative pain. If a home exercise program (HEP) was given to you, follow it as instructed.

Please call us if you have a concern. Try to avoid going straight to the emergency department unless you feel that it is an emergency. Often times many issues can be addressed by the home health service or with a quick phone call with our staff. You may also call the surgical floor at OCH Regional Medical Center at 662-615-3260. The nurses can be a great resource for questions. Unnecessary emergency room visits clog the system for those truly needing it.

Do not get surgical incisions wet or dirty until approved by your provider.

Constipation often happens after general anesthesia and surgery. Starting soon after surgery, taking an over the counter medicine such as Pericolace can help.

Swelling after an extremity procedure is common. Often elevation will help. You are to leave the dressing on unless instructed otherwise, but you can loosen any wraps (like an ACE wrap) if you feel they are too constrictive.

Do NOT get a tattoo until approved. Yes, we know, but it has happened and an infection occurred.

Some drainage on your surgical dressing may be seen. There should not be active oozing that soils your bed or clothing. If so, please call.

DOCTORS EXCUSES FOR TIME OFF WORK/ABSENCES - FORMS

Our staff will assist with any paperwork that may be needed to document that you were under our care. These documents can be time consuming for our staff and fees may apply. Please give these documents to our staff as soon as possible.

OCH Sports Medicine & Orthopedics Center - (2024)

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