June 1999 NL

 

  Double Haul

 

The Newsletter of The "Salty" Flyrodders of New York June 1999

 

The "Salty" Flyrodders of New York meet monthly at the Queens Botanical Gardens, 43-50 Main Street , Flushing, about one mile north of the LIE. Meetings are held at 8 p.m. on the first Monday of the month, except during January, July and September when they take place on the 3rd Wednesday.

 

THE NEXT MEETING WILL BE HELD ON: June 7th (see inside for details)

 

 

Striped Bass are Back!

Copyright 1999 by the New York Times, reprinted by permission

 

No fish is more emblematic of New York’s waterfront setting than the striped bass. "Its symmetry, marks, and satin sheen," wrote Genio Scott 130 years ago, "render it one of the most picturesque and interesting fishes in the world, independent of its great game, generous play, and luxury as a dinner fish." One rarely hears more enjoyable news than the report this spring, from up and down the Hudson River, that striped bass have returned in greatly increased numbers and sizes. There is even better news. In the lower river the bass have generally been testing below the Federal limit allowed for PCB’s, which were released into the river years ago by General Electric.


 

 

 

It was the presence of PCB’s, as well as depleted fish stocks, that ended the commercial striper fishery in the Hudson River in 1976. So the news of increased runs and lower PCB’s has naturally led to pressure to reopen the fishery. Gov. George Pataki has, in fact, announced that fishery officials are considering doing just that. But to resume commercial fishing for striped bass in the Hudson anytime soon would be a serious mistake.

Some responsible environmentalists such as John Cronin, the president of Riverkeeper Inc., thinks the time may come to bring back commercial fishing as a traditional part of river life. But it is clearly too early to contemplate such a step now, just when the fish stocks have rebounded. In our view, since striped bass can also be caught in oceans and bays, it would be a sounder long-term policy to leave their Hudson spawning grounds off limits to all commercial fishing for the foreseeable future. Also, if the Federal Environmental Protection Agency decides to force General Electric to clean up its mess by dredging parts of the river, more PCB’s might be dislodged from the riverbed, potentially raising their levels in the fish again.

 

For all the pleasure the returning bass bring — and who can deny it? — they offer several vital lessons. Stripers have come back because commercial fishing was severely restricted. They have come back because no dams block access to their spawning grounds and because the waters they live and breed in have grown steadily cleaner. Hard as they are, these lessons should be rigorously applied, as they fit, to other threatened species — to Atlantic and Pacific salmon, to swordfish and perhaps cod. Bringing back the striped bass was not simple or painless. Here they are, nevertheless.

 

 

 

Letter from the President

 

 

Kudos to Kris Jop. A great talk from a very knowledgeable guide. If fishing the Monomoy Flats sounds like something you want to do (and why wouldn’t you?) Kris is the man. Also read on, for an article from Kris, right in this issue of the newsletter. Did somebody say conclave? Well, funny you should mention it. June 4th. Is just right around the corner. This years conclave is shaping up to be something special. Everything is in place. The fish look to be very eager and the bar list has been submitted for the hospitality room. I’m done! Look forward to a special addition to the conclave this year. I think something that has long been overdue. I want it to be a surprise, so I’m not talking. Pins and needles, pins and needles. I’ve spoken to Nick Curcione, and he is doing well and is looking forward to the conclave. The Monday night following the conclave (June 7th) Charlie Robinson of Shallow Water Guide Service will give us his own brand of fly fishing wisdom. Well worth attending.

I’ll see you at the conclave

Thanx

Frank

 

 

 

 

Anything Goes With Jack

By Jack Denny

Hook setting is never a topic I hear much about at our meetings, where the fish are and what type of bait is around are the most common topics. How to set the hook never comes up. I never think much about setting the hook until I do it wrong, which does happens once in a while. There several way to set the hook that most fly rodders use, the strip strike and two handed method. The strip strike (setting the hook with the line while stripping in the fly) is a sure way to set the hook into the fish’s mouth. Driving a 2/0 hook into the hard mouth of a striper is not an easy thing to do, you must have made the right preparations. Sharp hooks are a must for all fly rodders to be successful and this can not be emphasized enough. Make sure your hooks have a good sharp point (right out of the box is sharp but not sharp enough even for Tiemco or other laser sharpened hooks), dull hooks will only mean missed opportunities. There are plenty of hook sharpening tools on the market so there should be no excuse for not having one. Learn how to sharpen a hook quickly by practicing in front of the TV with some old hooks while watching the evening news. Touch up your hooks after catching a few fish with the same fly.

The June 7th meeting will feature Charlie

Robinson of Shallow Water Guide Service who will expound on fishing from shore on the South Fork of Long Island. Also expect many fishtales from the Conclave.

This past April saw me hook a nice striper, I mean a very nice striper. I had hooked the fish at the end of my cast and fought it fish right up to my partner who was standing a rod length out in front me. The bass began to thrash around on the top; its broad tail beat the water to a froth and try as I might I could not move the fish the last few feet. I finally made some ground by flipping my rod on its side and soon I saw my leader come up out of the water. The fish’s back broke the surface and it looked like the fight was over when all of a sudden the hook pulled free and the fish swam off. Now, this is not the first big bass to beat me nor will it be the last (I hope) but I can’t help wondering what went wrong? I checked the hook and found it to be sharp but it could have been sharper. The hook set was good but as I played the events over in my mind this too could have been better. Things happen even if you are prepared.

Small hooks (let us say #8 through #2) are constructed lighter and thinner and need a lot less force to drive home the point. These hooks can be set by the pressure of the fish running against the drag of the line and reel in a "grab and run" situation. Alan Finkelman (past Salty President and now Florida Keys guide) showed me how to set the hook on a big tarpon and dammed if it didn’t work. Alan doesn’t use big hooks and sure enough the drag of the line and reel did the hook setting as my first tarpon ever hooked took off like a dragster with a jet engine. This technique works well when the fish are fast on the take off but what about stripers or bluefish that take the fly and just don’t take off? The angler must set the hook and even then there are times when these fish don’t know they are on the end of your line until you start pulling. While fishing on a friend’s boat several years ago, I hooked a bonito right about 10 feet out. I saw the fish swim up and take the fly and then do nothing!?! It just stayed there and shook its head for what seemed like forever. I kept a tight line but this bonito was not going anywhere until I put some major pressure on the fish. Finally it realized what the game was all about and off he went in true bonito fashion.

Lifting the rod to set the hook is wrong. It just pulls the fly out of the fish’s mouth and even if the hook finds a piece of the fish it can not be set deep enough. My friend Jim usually starts his day off with this type of hook setting technique and then settles down to doing it right soon afterwards. Strip strike and then lift the rod in that order to ensure a positive hook up. Using a two handed retrieve means you have to set the hook pulling the fly with two hands. The two handed retrieve keeps the fly rodder in constant contact with fly, hook-ups seem to be more successful using this type of retrieve. Glenn Mikkelson (Salty member, professional fly tyer and surf guide) is a master at this and he feels the two handed retrieve is one of the best ways to work a fly and hook a fish. Fishing ocean beaches requires the fly rodder to pay close attention to where the fly is at all times, rolling surf and strong currents can create slack in your line.

Tippet size and hook size goes hand in hand. Don’t use a 6 pound tippet and a 4/0 hook, you just can not drive a big hook in a hard mouth with such light line even if the hook has been sharpened to surgical standards. Light line and small hooks go hand in hand. Heavier tippets let you set a larger hook with authority and without fear of breaking off the fish. If you are searching for a world’s record this is something to consider but if you are an everyday fly rodder just wanting to enjoy an evening’s sport then use the heaviest line you can get away with. I have been using 15 pound test fluorocarbon lately with good results. It is heavy enough to set the hook with some force and tough for the fish to see.

So as you can see there are different factors at play when hooking a fish. Most of us don’t take the time to think about it until a large fish is swimming off after only a brief battle that should have lasted much longer. Sharpening the hook is the first step, setting the hook is next and landing your prize is the reward for doing it right.

 

 

FLY TYING CORNER

Fly of the Month- Franks Crab Hatch fly

Frank Abbate III

 

 

Fly Profile-About 3 year’s ago I started receiving many requests for very tiny crab pattern’s. A good crab pattern, especially one that sinks, is always a productive and popular pattern to use for bass and weakfish. These were made usually with deer hair or wool, and even granny’s knitting yarn. They continue to catch fish and make saltwater fly fishermen very happy. And you know, we all want to be very, very happy.

Frank’s Crab Hatch Fly will do just that, or at least help you on your way to bliss. As I mentioned earlier, the requests I started to receive were for very tiny crab imitations that didn’t sink so fast. The reason being, was that customers were noticing these swarms of infant crabs, much like cinder worms floating in the new and full moon currents. The larger versions of crab flies just weren’t cutting the mustard. The crab hatch fly is tied with a length of Corsair tubing tied over the shank of the hook. This allows the tier greater flexibility in determining the size of the crab carapace and therefore the size of the crab. Try this fly when a crab hatch is evident, but don’t be afraid to just drift them along a current, much like drifting a dry fly in a searching mode.

 

Materials needed

Hook- Mustad 34007, Gamakatsu SP 11 size 4,6, or 8

Thread-mono thread fine

Carapace-1/3" corsair tubing, white or chartreuse

Eyes-burnt 15lb. mono leader material

Legs-thin natural rubber bands

Shell coating- Softex

Marking pen- olive,brown,red

5 minute epoxy

White and pink powdered paint.

Goop

 

Tying instructions-

 

Step 1 – Place hook in vice. Tie in thread behind hook eye, and build a light foundation, ending at the bend of the hook.

Step 2 – Cut a piece of tubing approx. 1/4" to 1/2" in length. Squeeze and compress one end and secure at the bend. Lift front end of tubing and wind thread towards and ending at the hook eye. Squeeze and compress tubing at this point and tie off. (compressing and tying down the ends of the tubing causes a slight air pocket, remember that this is not a floating fly, per se, it is more of a suspending fly, sinking ever so slowly)

Step 3 – Burn the end of a piece of mono for the eyes. Make two about 1/4" in length. Slip the pair of eyes into an opening of the corsair weave

Step 4 – Color the eyes black.

Step 5 – Cut 4 pieces of rubber band, and set aside. Turn the fly over and place a small amount of Goop on the belly of the fly and begin placing each of the legs at each corner of the fly. Let dry, about 20 minutes or so.

Step 6 – When the goop is dry, mix a small amount of 5 min. epoxy with a dash of white and pink powdered paint. Coat over the bottom. Let dry.

Step 7 – Brush on some Softex on top of the carapace, let dry.

Step 8 – Color the carapace with the brown and olive pen. Tip the ends of the rubber bands with your red pen.

 

With this you’re done. See we’re happy already.

Fishing tip – Try fishing two at the same time with a dropper loop attached.

 

 

 

THE GUIDES’ SIDE

Our new monthly feature

 

 

SHALLOW WATER GUIDE SERVICE

Charlie Robinson (516) 283-5588

 

I have never seen so many grass shrimp 1 inch long. Floating shrimp and worm flies will work, on floating fly lines. Flies I would use at the conclave, green and white Deceivers 4" long, shrimp, small squid, Gartside gurglers and small floating crab flies. I know of six bass caught in the last two weeks with five inch mantis shrimp in their stomachs. There are fish in every bay and ocean beach. I like falling tides. Sag pond inlet is open. Enter water when fishing at night very slowly, you’ll want to start fishing before your feet are wet. Do not make loud noises. Sound travels faster in water. This is why I never fish at night with more than 2 people. Do not shine any lights in the water. Turn your back towards the fish to change flies or unhook fish. Have fun.

 

NORTH FLATS GUIDING

Capt.David Blinken (516) 324-3241

The fish are in from the Peconics to Montauk. Blues 5-12lbs schoolie bass from 12-26in, weaks 12-14inches. The flats are picking up with warm calm days being best and many of the backwaters are holding many bass. Blues are in the rips and weaks are in all the canals. The bait is just showing but not thick so the fish are eating if you get the fly to them. That’s all for now. Tight lines.

 

MAVERICK CHARTERS

Capt. Joe Blados (516) 765-3670

 

Blues to 11 lbs were in Southold Bay on the 13th of May. Two days later the 6 lb size took their spot with the bigger fish moving behind large schools of bunker in the Peconics.

Bass action is excellent with mixed sized fish up to 20 lbs now in the bay. The bigger fish are difficult to entice, not only with a fly but even spin tackle failed to get anything but a look. It can be frustrating seeing these fish in the shallows and throwing everything in the boat at them with no results.

Weakfish are in the western part of Peconic Bay, however not many fish over 20" are reported and you can expect to see the fish out of there if those big blues move in for a visit. Best bet for the weaks is at dawn or dusk.

If the bait holds in the bay so will the fish. Water clarity is very good even with the persistent east winds. LI Sound has its share of fish, with Mattituck Inlet being a best bet area, but I love those flats and will stay inside for now.

 

 

DRAGON FLY CHARTERS

Capt. Scott Holder (516) 840-6522

 

Well the year is turning into a good one. The Bass are here in force, Weak fish are being taken on the South Shore with some reports of fish being taken on the North Shore. The North Shore has had excellent Bass action so far and I have done better in the Smithtown area than in Fire Island to date, but I have a suspicion that is about to change as the Weak fish are more active and the Bass and Blues settle in. Fire Island is the place to get big Weaks using sinking lines with White Half and Half Clousers. I prefer the outgoing tide for these fish. The drift is very important you want to throw the fly diagonally up the current and let it sink. A single hand strip works well . Make sure you have contact with the Fly on the swing as the fly starts to straighten out against the tide this is where I get most of my fish. Blue fish from 4 -8 pounds have worked their way into South Shore Bays and Inlets, feeding on spearing and small bunker. Yes the bunker are in the Great South Bay, in numbers I have not seen in years. Get those bunker patterns out and try for some big Bass. I know that will be a Fly I will be using a lot

 

Good Luck in your hunt for big fish.

LUCKY STRIKE

Capt. Ken Turco (516) 728-3797

 

STRIPERS ARE IN !!!

Tuesday through Friday. Great action. Several keeper size. Largest 33". Spearing pattern best.

 

Striper Lives and Conservation

By Kris Jop

 

Another winter is behind us, striped bass is showing up in Buzzards Bay and fishermen start reporting first catches. This is the beginning of another fishing season in Massachusetts. But before reporting fishing conditions in the Buzzards Bay area where I fish in early May, I want to share with you my concern about the future of the striped bass fishery.

Bill Uffner and the famous dieting striper.

 

 

Concern began in June of last year when Bill Uffner caught a 44" striper that weighed less than 20 pounds. After Bill’s catch my client caught a few fish in the range but all these fish were healthy and their weight was proportional to their size. I did not make much of this individual accident until fishermen throughout New England repeatedly asked me questions about undersize stripers. These fishermen were concerned because they caught thinner fish more frequently last year than in previous years. Then I remembered a small article in the July l998 issue at "On the Water" discussing the findings of the Atlantic Menhaden Advisory Committee. The Committee’s report revealed citations of diseased and malnourished striped bass in Chesapeake Bay and the depletion of menhaden stock which is one of the main forage fish for striped bass. Additionally, the rates of their recruitment seem to be declining as well.

The physical conditions of striped bass reflect the quality of the food they consume. Studies conducted by scientists from the University of Maryland indicated that since 1996, increasing numbers of striped bass females have been found in poor nutritional conditions. The poor conditions certainly adversely affects their chances for successful reproduction and make them more vulnerable to diseases and effects of pollutants. Large cows, in order to be healthy need to consume food containing high levels of fatty acids like sand eels and silversides as well as food of a lesser quality which can fill them up like herring or menhaden.

Should we be concerned about the malnourished striped bass? Studies indicate that the greater the fish size the greater it s fertility. The young spawning females (l8-25") lay on a average only 14, 000 eggs while those over 50 pounds lay 3.5 million. Since mouths of striped bass larvae do not form until they are 2-4 days old, their nourishment comes from a large yolk sack, with an attached oil globule. Eggs produced by females weighing 10 pounds or more have a greater probability of hatching than eggs produced by smaller females. Since they are larger and have greater yolk and oil reserves, larvae from larger females may be able to withstand food deprivation for a longer periods of time.

The portion of large cows that are in poor nutritional condition most likely will not reproduce and more and more small females will be reproducing with minimal success rate. The spawning area for striped bass is relatively small and defined by water salinity (3-7 parts per thousand). Females appear to return to their own natal area to spawn. So if the spawning area is taken by small females even when large cows are ready for spawning they have tendency to re-suspend the eggs and not reproduced. The potential for disaster is real, recruitment from small fish will not be able to sustain a stripe bass population levels. We need to review current regulations and try to better protect large cows because they represent the base for future populations. I hope that this short summary of a few facts from the striped bass life cycle may help fishermen understand my concern.

 

TURCO’S TERRITORY

By Tom Baumann

On May 12 a friend and I had what has become our annual fishing trip to Shinnecock bay with Ken Turco aboard his 25 foot Boston Whaler center console. Shinnecock bay is approximately six miles wide and as much as three miles across. It is Ken’s backyard where he has fished for longer than some Salty members have been alive. To say he knows this fishery is insufficient. I think if you were to drain the bay, exposing every bump, hump, unmarked channel and piece of structure Ken would learn nothing new. My companion for the day, Ed, has been a Coast Guard licensed captain for more than 30 years and has fished from Maine to Key West with dozens of different guides. He says none know their fishery better than Ken. He has an uncanny ability to put you on fish. If you tire of flyfishing or winds make it difficult, he always has rigged spinning outfits ready. Either way you’re going to catch fish. Last year we caught and released some 3 dozen bass. Ken thought it was a slow day. This year we left the dock at 6 a.m. By 7 we had two keepers for dinner and were releasing 30 inch and larger fish. Of course there are never any guarantees but next year we’ll be back.

 

 

CONSERVATION

By Alan J Evelyn, Conservation Chair

 

JUNE’S CONSERVATION NEWS

 

New York Sportfishing Federation report from Capt. Scott Holder (dragonflycharters.com).

 

1. The Fluke regulations have changed to a 16" minimum and an 8 fish max.

 

2. There seems to be a growing awareness on bycatch on commercial fisherman, and there are some plans to reduce the allowable bycatch to conserve "Non-commercial Species".

 

3. There are other management plans up for consideration or revision: Striped Bass, Weakfish Horseshoe Crab (the crabs are being harvested for at alarming rates for commercial use, i.e. bait, pharmaceuticals), Bluefish, Tautog, and, (Blackfish).

 

4. There is also Amendment One the ongoing debate between recreational and commercial quotas. The NYSF is actively opposing any change to the regulations that increase commercial quotas, especially when it calls for reduced quotas for the recreational fisherman.

 

5. On the lighter side, the NYSF will be having a barbecue this summer with dates to be announced. They are also sponsoring Teach A Kid TO Fish program on June 5, volunteers welcomed and always needed. To find out how to be a volunteer call (516) 563-1825.

 

 

COASTAL CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION NEW YORK OPPOSES REPEAL OF COMMERCIAL BAG LIMIT FOR BLACKFISH

Coastal Conservation Association of New York (CCA NY) has expressed its opposition to legislation sought by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (the DEC) which would revise state law by eliminating the commercial bag limit for blackfish, which is now 25 fish per vessel, and at the same time extend the DEC’s regulatory authority over the species until 2002. CCA NY notes that commercial fishermen are organized to support the elimination of the commercial bag limit, and that warns that, unless recreational fishermen raise their voices in opposition to the measure, commercial interests could prevail.

The current commercial bag limit was a response to a precipitous decline in the blackfish population, brought about by a recent, sharp increase in commercial pressure on the species. It was signed into law in late 1997, after lawmakers approved legislation introduced by Assemblyman Robert Sweeney of Lindenhurst and Senator Owen Johnson of Babylon, and strongly supported by CCA NY and other angling interests.

The near collapse of the blackfish population has also drawn the attention of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (the ASMFC) which has drafted a management plan for the species. After a first round of bag and size limits failed to halt the fish’s decline, and after New York’s 25 fish commercial limit was enacted, ASMFC mandated an additional 45% decrease in fishing mortality. To achieve that reduction, New York imposed a strict bag limit of only one fish per angler during the period of June 1st through October 6, the time when most New York anglers are actively pursuing their sport. While the bag limit did remain at 10 fish for the rest of the year, most of that time falls outside the traditional "season" for saltwater angling. Except for a few weeks in the spring and fall, the recreational tautog fishery has now been effectively relegated to the few persons who have access to vessels that can and do safely operate safely throughout the winter. Commercial fishermen, on the other hand, can harvest 25 fish per day throughout the year, except for a brief closed season extending through March 1 to April 7.

In 1998 when recreational fishermen saw their size limit increase from 13 to 14 inches in order to reduce their harvest, an emergency regulation issued by the DEC lowered the commercial minimum size from 16 to 14 inches, allowing commercial operators to take smaller fish at a time when the state was under a mandate to reduce fishing mortality.

Commercial fishermen, already enjoying privileges not shared by the angling public, now seek further advantage by eliminating the commercial bag limit. Faced with an ASMFC mandate that requires blackfish harvest to be strictly controlled, any additional privileges granted to commercial fishermen must ultimately be offset by subjecting anglers to additional restrictions and further limiting public access to the resource. In a letter sent to legislators and regulators, Charles Witek, Chairman of CCA NY, stated,

Eliminating the 25 fish commercial bag limit would not serve the interests of marine conservation. It would also be extremely bad policy, since it would serve to further concentrate a public resource in the hands of a few individuals who would convert it into a vehicle for private profit, while making the same public resource less available for the use and enjoyment of hundreds and thousands of private citizens who participate in recreational fishing in the marine waters of the State of New York.

 

As an alternative to the DEC’s program bill, CCA NY asks anglers to support legislation introduced in the Assembly by Assemblyman Robert Sweeny and Thomas DiNapoli. The Bill, numbered A7934, would extend the DEC’s regulatory authority over blackfish without eliminating the commercial bag limit. Anglers are also asked to express their desire that a companion bill be introduced in the senate.

Comments in favor of A7934 and opposed to the DEC’s bill to eliminate the bag limit, should be addressed to Assemblyman Richard Brodsky, Chairman, Environmental Conservation Committee, 625 Legislative Office Building, Albany New York 12247.

On the Senate Side, comments opposing the DEC’s program bill and requesting introduction of a companion bill to A7934 should be addressed to Senator Owen Johnson, 23-24 Argyle Square, Babylon, NY 11702. For further information, contact John McMurray, CCA NY Executive Director at 516 422-4162, send e-mail to director@ccany.org or write to CCA NY, PO Box 1118,

West Babylon, NY 11704.

 

SUPPORT LEGISLATION

 

Once again Assemblyman Robert K Sweeney and Thomas DiNapoli. are taking the lead and working to protect our fisheries The Bill, numbered A7934, would extend the DEC’s regulatory authority over blackfish without eliminating the commercial bag limit. This legislation deserves and needs our support. This is the letter that I sent to my Assemblyman and to Assemblyman Brodsky. Please feel free to copy it word for word, just use some of the language or ignore completely. The important thing is to write and voice your support.

Please write today!

 

Dear Assemblyman Brodsky:

I respectfully urge you to support and pass into law Assembly Bill A7934 introduced by Assemblymen Robert K. Sweeney and Thomas DiNapoli . This Act would extend the DEC’s regulatory authority over Blackfish without eliminating the commercial bag limit. The current commercial bag limit was a response to a precipitous decline in the blackfish population, brought about by a recent, sharp increase in commercial pressure on the species

The near collapse of the Blackfish population has also drawn the attention of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (the ASMFC) which has drafted a management plan for the species. After a first round of bag and size limits failed to halt the fish’s decline, and after New York’s 25 fish commercial limit was enacted, ASMFC mandated an additional 45% decrease in fishing mortality. To achieve that reduction, New York imposed a strict bag limit of only one fish per angler during the period of June 1st through October 6, the time when most New York anglers are actively pursuing their sport. While the bag limit did remain at 10 fish for the rest of the year, most of that time falls outside the traditional "season" for saltwater angling. Except for a few weeks in the spring and fall, the recreational Tautog fishery has now been effectively relegated to the few persons who have access to vessels that can and do safely operate safely throughout the winter. Commercial fishermen, on the other hand, can harvest 25 fish per day throughout the year, except for a brief closed season extending through March 1 to April 7.

Eliminating the 25 fish commercial bag limit would not serve the interests of marine conservation. It would also be extremely bad policy, since it would serve to further concentrate a public resource in the hands of a few individuals who would convert it into a vehicle for private profit, while making the same public resource less available for the use and enjoyment of hundreds and thousands of private citizens who participate in recreational fishing in the marine waters of the State of New York.

I respectfully urge you to support and pass into law Assembly Bill A7934 introduced by Assemblymen Robert K. Sweeney and Thomas DiNapoli . rather than the legislation sought by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (the DEC) This Act would extend the DEC’s regulatory authority over blackfish without eliminating the commercial bag limit.

Protecting the environment and in particular our fishery resources is one of my highest priorities. Thank you for considering my view and for working on this important issue.

Sincerely,

 

NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE NUMBER

Need to know where to write your NY State representative? These web sites can provide you with the information: State Board of Elections at www.elections.ny.us, New York State Assembly at www.assembly.state.ny.us or the New York State Senate at www.senate.state.ny.us By phone you can contact the State’s Voter Information line at 1-800-367-8683.

Remember, if you want other conservation issues brought to the Salty’s attention, please talk to me at the monthly meeting or contact me at: home

(516) 256-0726, work: (718) 951 6522, work fax: (718) 951-4744 or by email: aevelyn@brooklyn.cuny.edu.

 

  

Joe Todaro with A Moriches Striper

 

 

May Fishing Trip – Breezy Point, guided by Steve Walden

 

May 22, 1999 – Saturday evening. I met "Salties" Rich Turco, Joel Radding, John Doyle and Alan Evelyn at the parking lot in Floyd Bennet Field. I issued maps of the area and then discussed the various fishing opportunities of the Gateway National Recreation Area within Brooklyn and Rockaway(Ft. Tilden-Breezy Point-Riis Park.) We took a quick ride to Riis Park to check the route to the parking lot and then we proceeded to the parking area at the end of Breezy and fished. The tide was at the bottom of the outgoing at sunset and bluefish were caught.

June Trip-To be announced at the meeting June 7, and will be guided by Bruce Marin.

 

 

 

 

 

Salty’s Annnual Conclave the Star of the Month for the Year’s Stories

 

The XXXII annual Conclave will be held at the Soundview Inn in Greenport, NY June 4,5, and 6. It is now too late to reserve a room for the conlave but the day program which includes the morning show with Nick Curcione along with casting demonstrations and lessons through the afternoon.

 

The banquet in the evening features many major raffle prizes, good food and a special event this year. Plus you can hear all the fish tales of the previous evenings’ adventures. There are approximately 95 signed up for the fullweekend however we welcome members and their guests to come and share the day with the group.

 

The fees for the day including the banquet are $65 and the fees for the day program only are $35.

 

There will be ample time to purchase the raffle tickets. The prizes this year include a complete Orvis rod and reel outfit, a Scott 10 wt three piece rod, a Teton Reel, wader bags, and 6 guided trips by contributing saltwater guides on long island. Many more prizes will be raffled off for the benefit of our conservation efforts.

 

Come share the day with our growing membership as well as fish with best and the novices. There will be group leaders for those of you new to the area. The Hospitality suite will be open for views and news throughout the weekend.

 

 

 

The Second Annual East End Striped Bass & Bluefish Championship to Benefit Boys Harbor will be held Saturday, July 10 in East Hampton.

Tournament Rules

1. This is a catch and release tournament. Fish must be landed and photographed with a measuring device by the guide and released alive to constitute a catch. Length measurements must be noted (with release times) on all scoresheets. Points only to those releases measuring 16" or greater, full length. All fish must be caught from a boat.

2. The rules of the tournament will follow all IGFA regulations governing fly and spin tackle.

3. Line no heaver than 15-pound test breaking strength or IGFA rated leader material can be used.

4. No bait, chumming, tipping or trolling is permitted. Artificials only in both fly and spin categories.

5. Anglers have the option of being accompanied by a coast guard licensed captain. All anglers, whether accompanied by a captain or not, earn the same release points. Captains may not fish.

6. Only one rod in the water at a time. Bow time must be split equally between both anglers when there is more than one angler on a boat.

7. No more than two anglers per boat.

8. Boats must depart from and return to

tournament headquarters at the appointed start and end time. All guides must sign in and out at the beginning and end of the tournament. Anglers must report to tournament headquarters by 7:15am to attend Rules Meeting. Boats must be docked at tournament headquarters by 7:15am.

9. Boats must depart dock 8am and return by 4pm; later will result in DSQ.

10. Rules committee will make any weather related decisions. All decisions by the Rules committee are final.

11. Any violation will result in DSQ. All protests must be in writing to the Rules committee no later than 4:30pm on the day of the protest. Anything later will not be considered.

12. Points will be awarded in each of the following categories: Grand Champion, Largest Striped Bass, Largest Bluefish, Most Striped Bass Releases, Most Bluefish Releases, Fly Division Champion, Spin Division Champion.

 

 

Guided Entry Fee: Team $1000 / Individual $800

Non-Guided Entry Fee: Team $600 / Individual $500

If you’d like to receive an entry form, mail a self-addressed stamped envelope to: ZenBait, 131 East 81st Street, #2, New York, NY 10028 Attn: David Blinken. Deadline for entries is 6/15/99.

 

OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM

GUIDED Entry Fee: Team $1000/Ind$800

NON GUIDED FEE: Team $600/Ind $500

Angler Name_____________________

Address_________________________

City/State/Zip_____________________

Guides Name and Phone____________

________________________________

___Check If Need Guide assigned.

___Check to go on Our Mailing list

Make checks Payable to Boys Harbor

Mail to: Zenbait,131 East 81st St,#2

New York, NY 10028

Attention: David Blinken

I have read and agree to abide by all Tournament Rules.

_________________________________

signature and date